Staying​ ​bright​ ​on​ ​your​ ​bike​ ​is​ ​not​ ​only​ ​important​ ​for​ ​safety,​ ​it’s​ ​a​ ​mandatory​ ​requirement​ ​if  you’re​ ​on​ ​UK​ ​roads.​ ​To​ ​be​ ​compliant​ ​with​ ​road​ ​user​ ​regs,​ ​your​ ​bike​ ​needs​ ​a​ ​white​ ​front​ ​light  and​ ​a​ ​red​ ​rear​ ​light.​ ​This,​ ​of​ ​course,​ ​is​ ​to​ ​be​ ​seen​ ​–​ ​but​ ​just​ ​how​ ​much​ ​illumination​ ​you​ ​need  and​ ​how​ ​long​ ​for​ ​depends​ ​on​ ​your​ ​riding​ ​plans.

SEE​ ​–​ ​AND​ ​BE​ ​SEEN
Basic​ ​lights​ ​to​ ​be​ ​seen​ ​on​ ​the​ ​road​ ​begin​ ​at​ ​around​ ​50​ ​lumens​ ​(the​ ​most​ ​common  measurement​ ​of​ ​bike​ ​light​ ​intensity),​ ​but​ ​commuters​ ​and​ ​urban​ ​cyclists​ ​don’t​ ​have​ ​to​ ​spend  too​ ​much​ ​to​ ​get​ ​a​ ​100​ ​lumen​ ​light​ ​which​ ​will​ ​not​ ​only​ ​deliver​ ​good​ ​visibility,​ ​but​ ​provide​ ​some  view​ ​of​ ​the​ ​road​ ​ahead​ ​too.

For​ ​a​ ​good​ ​view​ ​out​ ​front​ ​on​ ​poorly​ ​lit​ ​roads,​ ​look​ ​for​ ​a​ ​minimum​ ​of​ ​500​ ​lumens.​ ​The  Exposure​ ​Strada​ ​600,​ ​£199.95,​ ​is​ ​a​ ​front​ ​light​ ​built​ ​both​ ​to​ ​help​ ​you​ ​see​ ​and​ ​be  seen.​ ​Its​ ​600​ ​lumen​ ​highest​ ​setting​ ​burns​ ​for​ ​3hrs​ ​with​ ​a​ ​dip​ ​option​ ​lasting​ ​up​ ​to​ ​36hrs.​ ​A  small​ ​but​ ​powerful​ ​package​ ​–​ ​just​ ​135g​ ​–​ ​it’s​ ​ideal​ ​both​ ​for​ ​road​ ​riders​ ​wanting​ ​to​ ​steer​ ​clear  of​ ​extra​ ​weight​ ​and​ ​for​ ​commuters​ ​going​ ​for​ ​longer.

For​ ​brightness​ ​on​ ​a​ ​budget,​ ​the​ ​700​ ​lumen​ ​Moon​ ​Meteor​ ​X​ ​Auto​ ​Pro​ ​Front​ ​Light,​ ​£39.00,​ ​is​ ​a​ ​svelte​ ​84g​ ​and​ ​runs​ ​for​ ​90mins​ ​on​ ​full-whack​ ​or​ ​up​ ​to​ ​a​ ​massive​ ​45hrs​ ​in  flashing​ ​mode.​ ​What’s​ ​more,​ ​its​ ​Futuristic​ ​mode​ ​uses​ ​an​ ​integrated​ ​sensor;​ ​adjusting​ ​the​ ​light strength​ ​to​ ​the​ ​environment​ ​around​ ​you​ ​as​ ​you​ ​ride.

When​ ​lumens​ ​reach​ ​the​ ​thousands,​ ​they​ ​make​ ​for​ ​ideal​ ​MTB​ ​trail-illuminators​ ​and​ ​lights​ ​for  road​ ​rides​ ​in​ ​rural,​ ​unlit​ ​areas.​ ​Exposure’s​ ​Diablo​ ​MK9​ ​Front​ ​Light,​ ​£209.95​,  leaves​ ​no​ ​room​ ​for​ ​error​ ​unleashing​ ​up​ ​to​ ​1500​ ​lumens​ ​on​ ​trails​ ​or​ ​tarmac.​ ​It​ ​doesn’t  compromise​ ​on​ ​weight​ ​at​ ​120g​ ​and​ ​shines​ ​bright​ ​from​ ​1hr​ ​at​ ​full​ ​power​ ​up​ ​to​ ​24hrs​ ​on​ ​lower  settings.     Want​ ​brighter​ ​still?​ ​For​ ​the​ ​daddy​ ​of​ ​dazzle,​ ​the​ ​​lumen ​ ​ mama ​ ,​ ​look​ ​no​ ​further​ ​than​ ​the  Exposure​ ​MaXx-D​ ​MK10​ ​Front​ ​Light,​  ​£374.95,​ ​which​ ​throws​ ​out​ ​a​ ​whopping  3300​ ​lumens.​ ​Cable​ ​free,​ ​still​ ​relatively​ ​light​ ​at​ ​310g​ ​and​ ​burning​ ​bright​ ​for​ ​up​ ​to​ ​36hrs,​ ​this​ ​is  the​ ​ultimate​ ​dark​ ​night​ ​rider​ ​companion.

RADIANT​ ​REAR

Absolutely​ ​essential​ ​for​ ​cycling​ ​safety​ ​is​ ​a​ ​rear​ ​light​ ​and,​ ​for​ ​this,​ ​100​ ​lumens​ ​provides​ ​high  visibility​ ​without​ ​dazzling​ ​other​ ​road​ ​users.​ ​The​ ​Moon​ ​Nebula​ ​Rear​ ​Light, £43.99​ ​​will​ ​lighten​ ​you​ ​up​ ​without​ ​lightening​ ​your​ ​pocket.​ ​The​ ​eight-mode​ ​100​ ​lumens​ ​rear light​ ​is​ ​just​ ​44g,​ ​burns​ ​from​ ​70mins​ ​to​ ​20hrs​ ​and,​ ​unlike​ ​some​ ​rear​ ​light​ ​options,​ ​throws​ ​out​ ​a  270​ ​degree​ ​angle​ ​of​ ​illumination,​ ​making​ ​it​ ​particularly​ ​good​ ​for​ ​urban​ ​rides.

Looking​ ​for​ ​a​ ​great​ ​deal?​ ​Then​ ​look​ ​no​ ​further​ ​than​ ​CatEye’s​ ​Volt​ ​400​ ​XC​ ​Front​ ​and​ ​Rapid Mini​ ​Rear,​ ​just​ ​£59.99​ ​for​ ​both.​ ​The​ ​front​ ​sends​ ​out​ ​400​ ​lumens,​ ​with​ ​25​ ​out  back.​ ​Both​ ​USB​ ​rechargeable​ ​and​ ​cable-free,​ ​together​ ​these​ ​lights​ ​are​ ​a​ ​great​ ​package​ ​for  day-to-night​ ​cyclists​ ​about​ ​town.

Finding​ ​the​ ​right​ ​bike​ ​lights​ ​to​ ​suit​ ​both​ ​your​ ​riding​ ​style​ ​and​ ​your​ ​pocket,​ ​alongside​ ​a​ ​good  set​ ​of​ ​winter​ ​cycling​ ​clothes​​ ​is​ ​your​ ​ticket​ ​to​ ​enjoyable,​ ​worry-free  year-round​ ​riding​ ​day​ ​and​ ​night,​ ​and​ ​to​ ​lightening​ ​you​ ​up​ ​–​ ​even​ ​when​ ​it’s​ ​gloomy,​ ​grey​ ​or  even​ ​pitch​ ​black​ ​outside.

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